JAXA H-IIA ROCKET WILL LAUNCH A JOINT JAXA/NASA SATELLITE.

JAXA H-IIA ROCKET WILL LAUNCH A JOINT JAXA/NASA SATELLITE.

JAXA H-IIA ROCKET WILL LAUNCH A JOINT JAXA/NASA SATELLITE.

Photo Credit: Japan Aerospace Exploration Agency (JAXA). CLICK photo for larger view and see below for info and links.

At 1807 UTC (1307 EST) (0307 on the 28th JST) on February 27, 2014 the Japan Aerospace Exploration Agency (JAXA) will be launching the H-IIA (H-2A) rocket; Launch Vehicle No. 23 flying in its 202 configuration (H-IIA 202) carrying the joint NASA/JAXA Global Precipitation Management (GPM) Core satellite from Launch Area-Y1 (Also known as Area-Y1 or LA-Y1) at the Tanegashima Space Center (TNSC), Japan.
There are 2 active launch pads at Tanegashima, Launch Pad-1 (LP-1) and Launch Pad-2 (LP-2). They are in an area known as the Yoshinobu Launch Complex and designated as Launch Area-Y, Area-Y or LA-Y. They differentiate between pads by placing a (1) or a (2) after the designation, for example if you see basic launch data above you will see the HTV-4 will be launching from Pad-2.

JAXA’s Mitsubishi Heavy Industries H-IIA (H2A) rocket is a two (2) stage expendable rocket and is the medium lift vehicle in the H-II Rocket Family along with the H-II and the H-IIB and it stands 53m (173.8 ft.) tall.

Payload Fairing (4S) = for the H-IIA rocket is 12m (39 ft.) in height and has a diameter of 4 m (13.1 ft.) and is jettisoned after liftoff once it reaches a safe altitude where turbulence from the air won’t be a problem.

Second Stage = is liquid fueled utilizing hydrogen & oxygen (LOX/LH2) to power its single LE-5B engine and it burns for 530 seconds. It is 9.2 m (30.2 ft.) tall and 4m (13.1 ft.) in diameter. The second stage can be re-ignited up to three times.

Strap-on Boosters (SRB-A’s) = are solid fuel boosters utilizing polybutadiene for propellant and they burn for about 100 seconds. They are 15.1 m (49.5 ft.) tall and 2.5 m (8.2 ft.) in diameter.

First Stage = is liquid fueled utilizing liquid oxygen & hydrogen (LOX/LH2) to propel a single LE-7A engine that burn for about 390 seconds. It is 37.2 m (122 ft.) tall and 4 m (13.1 ft.) in diameter.
The H-IIA has a lift capacity of 10 tons to Low Earth Orbit (LEO), 4 tons to Geosynchronous Transfer Orbit (GTO), 4 tons to Sun Synchronous Orbit and only about 2.5 tons to Earth Escape Velocity.

Watch live: http://www.nasa.gov/ntv

JAXA main site: http://www.jaxa.jp/index_e.html

JAXA GPM satellite launch info: http://www.jaxa.jp/press/2013/12/20131226_h2af23_e.html

JAXA GPM mission page: http://www.jaxa.jp/countdown/f23/index_e.html

JAXA GPM satellite page: http://www.jaxa.jp/countdown/f23/overview/gpm_e.html

JAXA Tanegashima Space Center page: http://www.jaxa.jp/about/centers/tnsc/index_e.html

JAXA H-IIA Launch Vehicle page: http://www.jaxa.jp/projects/rockets/h2a/index_e.html

JAXA H-IIA launch vehicle specs: http://www.jaxa.jp/projects/rockets/h2a/design_e.html

Mitsubishi H-IIA Rocket page: http://h2a.mhi.co.jp/en/lineup/h2a/

JAXA H-IIA launch vehicle photo gallery: http://jda.jaxa.jp/category_p.php?lang=e&page=1&category1=1&category2=5&category3=&page_pics=50

Spaceflight 101 page for the H-IIA rocket: http://www.spaceflight101.com/h-iia-launch-vehicle-information.html

Spaceflight 101 page on the GPM Core mission: http://www.spaceflight101.com/gpm-core.html

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