Japan’s ISS Resupply Mission HTV-7 “Kounotori 7 or White Stork 7”

Image credit & copyright: Japan Aerospace Exploration Agency (JAXA).

Launch Alert: Saturday, September 22 at 17:52 UTC (13:52 EDT & 10:52 PDT), the Japan Aerospace Exploration Agency (JAXA), will be launching the Mitsubishi Heavy Industries H-IIB (H-2B) rocket; Launch Vehicle No. 7 (F7). It will be carrying the H-II Transfer Vehicle (HTV) also known as Kounotori “White Stork” Space Station resupply vehicle from Launch Area-Y2 (Also known as Area-Y2 or LA-Y2) at one of the most beautiful launch sites on Earth, the Tanegashima Space Center (TNSC), Japan. Once it arrives at Station, it will grappled and berthed to the Japanese Experimental Module (JEM) Kibo “Hope” by Canadarm 2 where it will remain for roughly six months before being destructively deorbited.

NOTE: This rocket is sometimes called the screamer because of the distinct sound that it makes at launch. See if you can pick it up if you watch live.

Tanegashima Space Center (TNSC): Tanegashima Space Center is located on the island of Tanegashima; the easternmost island of the Osumi Islands of Japan.  There are 2 active launch pads at Tanegashima; Launch Pad-1 (LP-1) and Launch Pad-2 (LP-2). They are in an area known as the Yoshinobu Launch Complex and designated as Launch Area-Y, Area-Y or LA-Y. They differentiate between pads by placing a (1) or a (2) after the designation. H-IIA rockets launch from Pad-1 while H-IIB rockets launch from Pad-2.

JAXA’s H-II Transfer Vehicle (HTV) Kounotori “White Stork”: The HTV is a 9.8 m (32.2 ft.) tall, 4.4 m (14.4 ft.) diameter, uncrewed, automated cargo spacecraft that is used to resupply the Japanese Experimental Module (JEM) Kibo “Hope” which is a segment of the International Space Station. Total payload capacity of the HTV is about 6,200 kg (13,669 lbs.) with 5,200 kg (11,464 lbs.) of that being pressurized cargo. With the retirement of Europe’s Automated Transfer Vehicle (ATV) in 2015, Japan’s HTV is one of only four vehicles capable of Station resupply with Soyuz Progress, SpaceX Dragon and Northrop Grumman’s Cygnus. Currently, the only vehicle able to return large amounts of cargo from orbit is SpaceX’s Dragon.

Mitsubishi Heavy Industries (MHI) H-IIB (H2B) Launch vehicle:

Height: 56 m (186 ft.)

Core Diameter: 5.2 m (17 ft.)

Width (1st stage & boosters): 10.2 m (33.5 ft.)

Stages: 2

Boosters: 4

Total Engines: 7 (6 in the first stage (including solids) and 1 in the second stage)

Total Thrust at Liftoff(2 LE-7A & 4 SRB-3A3 Boosters): 11,416 kN/2,566,419 lbf)

Mass: 531,000 kg (1,171,136 lb.)

Payload to Low Earth Orbit (LEO): 16,500 kg (36,400 lb.)

Payload to Geostationary Transfer Orbit (GTO): 8,000 kg (18,000 lb.)

Reusable: No

Cost: $112.5 million USD

Payload Fairing (4S): is a two-shell composite enclosure, 12 m (39 ft.) long with a diameter of 4 m (13.1 ft.). The fairings are used to protect the spacecraft during ascent through atmospheric turbulence and into space. Once the rocket has reached a safe altitude the fairings are jettisoned, exposing the spacecraft(s).

Second Stage:

Height: 11 m. (36 ft.)

Diameter: 4 m (13 ft.)

Engine(s): Single LE-5B engine

Engine Chambers: 1

Engine Type (cycle): Expander Bleed

Propellant Feed:

Chamber Pressure: 12.7 MPa or 127 bar or 1,840 psi

Fuel Type: Liquid

Fuel: Liquid hydrogen (LH2)

Oxidizer: Liquid Oxygen (LOX). LOX is often coupled with rocket propellant-1 (RP-1), liquid hydrogen (LH2) and methane (CH4) as it creates a high specific impulse.

Thrust (vacuum): 137 kN (31,000 lbf.)

Single LE-7A Thrust to Weight Ratio:

Specific Impulse (vacuum): 448 s

Burn Time: 499 s

Restart Ability: Yes; up to three times.

Reusable?: No

*

Strap-on Boosters (SRB-A3):

Height: 15,1 m. (49.5 ft.)

Diameter: 2.5 m (8.2 ft.)

Engine(s): N/A

Engine Chambers: 1

Engine Type (cycle): Solid

Propellant Feed: N/A

Chamber Pressure: 11.8 MPa or 118 bar or 1,700 psi

Fuel Type: Solid

Fuel: Hydroxyl-terminated polybutadiene (HTPB)

SRB-A3 Thrust (single)(sea level): 2,305 kN (518,000 lbf.)

SRB-A3 Thrust (all 4)(sea level): 9,220 kN (2,070,000 lbf.)

Specific Impulse (sea level): 283.6 s

Burn Time: 114 s

Restart Ability: No

Reusable?: No

First Stage:

Height: 38 m. (125 ft.)

Diameter: 5.2 m (17 ft.)

Width (1st stage & boosters): 10.2 m (33.5 ft.)

Engine(s): Two LE-7A Engine

Engine Chambers: 1

Engine Type (cycle): Staged combustion

Propellant Feed: Turbopump

Chamber Pressure: 12.7 MPa or 127 bar or 1,840 psi

Fuel Type: Liquid

Fuel: Liquid hydrogen (LH2)

Oxidizer: Liquid Oxygen (LOX). LOX is often coupled with rocket propellant-1 (RP-1), liquid hydrogen (LH2) and methane (CH4) as it creates a high specific impulse.

Single LE-7A Thrust (sea level): 843.5 kN (189.600 lbf)

Single LE-7A Thrust to Weight Ratio: 64.13

Total Thrust at Liftoff(2 LE-7A & 4 SRB-3A3 Boosters): 11,416 kN/2,566,419 lbf)

Specific Impulse (sea level/vacuum): 349 s/446 s

Burn Time: 352 s

Restart Ability: No

Reusable?: No

Stream Live:

NASA TV: http://www.nasa.gov/ntv

NASA Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/NASA/

NASA YouTube: https://www.youtube.com/NASA

JAXA YouTube: https://www.youtube.com/user/jaxachannel

HTV-7 Mission:

NASA HTV-7:

General 2018 Launch Schedule (Wiki): https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/2018_in_spaceflight

Japan Aerospace Exploration Agency (JAXA):

JAXA main site: http://global.jaxa.jp/

Twitter: https://twitter.com/jaxa_en

Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/JaxaJapanAerospaceExplorationAgency

Google Plus: https://plus.google.com/explore/jaxa

YouTube: https://www.youtube.com/user/jaxachannel

Necovideo Visual Solutions (NVS)(possible launch coverage):

Website: http://nvs-live.com/

YouTube: https://www.youtube.com/user/nvslivecom

NVS Twitter: https://twitter.com/nvslive?lang=en

NVS Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/nvslive/

JAXA H-IIB Rocket:

JAXA H-IIB Launch Vehicle: http://global.jaxa.jp/projects/rockets/h2b/index.html

H-IIB (Wiki): https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/H-IIB

JAXA H-II Transfer Vehicle (HTV) Kounotori “White Stork”:

JAXA HTV: http://global.jaxa.jp/projects/rockets/htv/

NASA HTV: https://www.nasa.gov/mission_pages/station/structure/elements/htv_about.html

HTV (Wiki): https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/H-II_Transfer_Vehicle

JAXA IMAGES:

JAXA Digital Image Archives: http://jda.jaxa.jp/en/

JAXA Digital Image Archives (Rockets): http://jda.jaxa.jp/category_p.php?lang=e&page=&category1=1&category2=&page_pics=50

TANEGASHIMA SPACE CENTER:

Tanegashima Space Center (TNSC), Japan: http://global.jaxa.jp/about/centers/tnsc/index.html

Tanegashima Space Center (TNSC), Japan PDF: http://global.jaxa.jp/activity/pr/brochure/files/centers02_e.pdf

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